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December 6, 2019, 10:45 am

Ventilator to Improve Pediatric Care in Ho Chi Minh City: From Julie Ferne Memorial Trust to Children’s Hospital No.2

(13:34:56 PM 29/10/2014)
(Tinmoitruong.vn) - In an effort to help improve pediatric care in Ho Chi Minh City, the New Zealand based Julie Ferne Memorial Trust has raised funds to donate a ventilator to the Children’s Hospital No.2. The handover ceremony has been scheduled for the morning of 29 October at the hospital.



The Newport e360 ventilator will be the first major medical equipment donation presented by the Trust. The trustees are aware of the serious shortage of life saving ventilators in the city from their personal experiences and as a result established the Julie Ferne Memorial Trust to meet this need.

“In 2012, my family was at the Children’s Hospital No.2 and saw a poor parent manually pumping a hand ventilator over three days to keep his baby alive,” said Mr. Sean Preston, a trustee and spokesman. That parent’s desperation and ultimate heartbrokenness, Mr. Preston continued, urged him and his family members to do something life saving in honor of their mother, Mrs. Julie Ferne, who loved her family and children everywhere.

The Preston family is proud to partner with the VinaCapital Foundation (VCF) to procure the ventilator, ensure that this critical piece of life saving equipment will be used and maintained properly and proper records will be kept of the foundation’s equipment donation.

VCF will assist the Trust by monitoring and evaluating the usage of the ventilator. Both organizations will work closely with the hospital staff to measure the work at hand against standard performance, which from VCF’s experience in managing healthcare projects throughout Vietnam, indicates that on average one ventilator will save the life of one child every week, 50 children per year. Mrs. Robin King Austin, CEO and Co-founder of VCF, stated, “ I have had doctors all over the country tell me that they have to make daily decisions regarding what babies live and what babies die because they lack sufficient ventilators to save them all. This donation from the Julie Ferne Memorial Trust will save lives every single day.”

Since 2012, the Julie Ferne Memorial Trust has raised funds from all over the world to advance pediatric care in Ho Chi Minh City, with a focus on helping child trauma sufferers. The Trust started out by providing training in occupational therapy at the Center of Rehabilitation and Support for Special Needs Children, which the Prestons consider a great honor given that their mother was a dedicated occupational therapist. Also having given financial aid to poor patients at the Children’s Hospital No.2, the Trust is optimistic about opportunities to do more good work in Vietnam, just like Mrs. Julie Ferne’s inspiring life as a healthcare worker, an Auckland artist and most importantly, a loving mother.

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